Wednesday

Study reveals how temperature affects your fat loss

I just read about this little factoid, and I thought it was pretty interesting, so wanted to pass along to you...

According to a 2006 study in the International Journal of Obesity, temperature may greatly affect your fat loss, both in the winter and the summer.  Men's Health magazine reported on this data recently with this:

"In 1923, the thermal standard for winter comfort in US homes was a brisk 64 degrees F.  By 1986, the average thermostat was set to a balmy 76 degrees. It's natural for us to upregulate our metabolism in winter to keep warm while downshifting in summer, when heat slows our appetite".

So the fact that modern society is always in a climate-controlled world now, and we are exposed to higher than normal temperatures than would be natural in the winter, and lower than normal temperatures in the summer is a possible variable that can mess with your natural metabolism.

The lesson... instead of keeping your thermostat in the mid 70's F or higher in the winter, try to keep it between 64-66 degrees F.  This will not only save you LOADS on your heating bill, but could also boost your metabolism in the winter months to help you lose fat.

And in the summer, if possible, use a little less air conditioning if it's not absolutely necessary. Get some fresh air and open the windows when it's not too blistering hot in the summer.  Or, if you live in a really hot humid area, perhaps just try to use a more moderate temperature, such as setting the AC at 78 degrees F instead of the 70-72 degrees that most people set their AC to.

Again, you'll not only save a TON on your energy bill, but could possibly help balance your natural metabolism a bit more.

Here is another important tactic from my colleague, and celebrity trainer, Wes Virgin:

See how my client Patricia lost 38 lbs in 4 weeks, and Charles lost 40 lbs using THIS technique

 
To your fat loss success,

Mike Geary
Certified Nutrition Specialist
Certified Personal Trainer

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